McDonnell Douglas DC-10

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The McDonnell Douglas DC-10 is a three-engine medium- to long-range widebody airliner, with two engines mounted on underwing pylons and a third engine at the base of the vertical stabilizer. The model was a successor to the company's DC-8 for long-range operations, and competed in the same markets as the Airbus A300, Boeing 747, and Lockheed L-1011 Tristar, which has a similar layout to the DC-10.

Production of the DC-10 ended in 1989 with 386 delivered to airlines and 60 to the U.S. Air Force as air-to-air refueling tankers, designated the KC-10 Extender. The DC-10 was succeeded by the related McDonnell Douglas MD-11 which entered service in 1990.

The DC-10 is a low-wing cantilever monoplane with a conventional tail unit with a single fin and rudder. It is powered by two turbofan engines mounted on underwing pylons and a third engine at the base of the vertical stabilizer. It has a retractable tricycle landing gear. The later series 30 and 40 have an additional two-wheel main landing gear on the centerline of the fuselage. It was designed to be a medium to long-range airliner with a widebody fuselage to seat over 250 passengers. It is operated by a flight-crew of three located on the flightdeck in the nose on the same level as the passenger cabin. The fuselage has underfloor stowage for cargo and baggage.

Variants

Currently there are two projects to model the DC-10 for FlightGear:

External links